Obama on the US: "We Are Not a Christian Nation"

I first heard this particular bit of BO wisdom last night and was so enraged that I couldn’t begin to formulate coherent thoughts. Instead, I was thinking, “wth?,” “*#*#$,” “#$*&,” WTF?,” “$@*&^,” and “#$*$&*.” And I simmered and stewed and fumed, and pretty much couldn’t get to sleep.

I’m not going to go into the history of this nation; that’s being done on other blogs and better than I could manage right now (still a bit fuming, to be honest). I’m not even going to point out that we are, indeed, a Christian–or more accurately, a Judeo-Christian–nation. We are, and we all know that. And (surprise, surprise) I’m not going to point out that if George W. Bush said something this insane and truly ridiculous, he’d be laughed off the stage (the world’s stage, that is, not just the one in Turkey). All of that is true, but I’m not going to say it.

What I am going to talk about is BO and how interesting it is that people are “filling in the gaps” in what he’s saying, creating in his words a meaning that is not there. This is done constantly with BO; he’s just a blank slate that everyone fills up with their own hopes, visions, and ideals. I’ve read that he’s really talking about America as a “melting pot” of religions, that we accept all religions here, and that we embrace freedom of religion. All true, of course, but not at all what he said. Or meant.

I suppose that he could be aligning himself with world leaders because he feels that we, the people of the world (not just America) are too incompetent, too ruled by our “guns and religion,” too unschooled to think for ourselves, and that he wants to take the power from the people by positing himself as the great thinker, someone who sees and knows so much more than anyone else and should therefore think for us all. I’m not keen on this theory, but there does seem to be some truth to it, don’t you think? Oh, wait, no, don’t think. Leave that to the idea man.

In his simpering and pandering whirlwind world tour, BO’s gone out of his way to fawn at the feet of the world’s leaders, simultaneously apologizing for all of the perceived slights of this country (some of which, of course, are real, not all, though) and coming back with absolutely nothing to show for it. Where are the promises of aid in his war in Afghanistan? Where is the union of nations swearing to aid the U. S. in its worthy fight there? Oh? Nowhere? Yep, okay, right. I keep hearing that he and the Russian leader whatzisface have agreed to eliminate nukes (and what a stellar plan that is now that everyone has them! Sure, let’s disarm the two “powers” in terms of nukes and see what happens next, should be fun), but they didn’t agree to that. They agreed to meet, in Russia, this summer to talk about doing that. Maybe if BO brings a soap on a rope and bows and curtseys and scrapes enough, the Russian leader will allow him to sit next to him in a news conference. That’s more than we gave Gordon Brown.

BO doesn’t like religion, and he doesn’t like its role in this country’s politics, but he’s keen enough to see that it has a role. That’s why he suddenly started saying things like “God Bless America” at the end of his speeches some time in 2007 (maybe in 2006, I can’t be bothered to check my own post on this sudden shift in his rhetoric). Did I believe for a moment that he was religious in that way? That this rhetorical maneuver was anything but pandering to the huge base of Christian and Jewish voters in this country? No, of course not. That’s why I know (or at least feel quite certain) that he meant what he said in Turkey, he truly wants to believe that this is not a Christian nation . . . or more accurately, he wishes that it wasn’t. But it is, and he knows it. He does. Why else change his speeches to include references to God in the midst of a campaign? Why else attend a political powerhouse church in Chicago (granted, run by a white hating, America hating freak, but still he, BO, sat there every Sunday for 20 years, and it wasn’t to learn the Word of God. It was for political ends.).

And wasn’t that a Bible (i.e. the Old and New Testament of the Judeo-Christian faith) under his hand at his inauguration? Wasn’t his right hand on the very Bible that Abraham Lincoln owned and read (and we know he read it and believed in a Christian God because he littered a zillion of his speeches and other documents with references not just to God but to specific passages in the Bible)? How can a man stand in front of the world, swearing on a Bible to protect and defend this nation, and then a few months later spout out this nonsense that this country, that one he swore on the Bible to protect and defend, is not a Christian nation? And why isn’t the world laughing at him?

He said that for political ends, too. He stood there and told a bold-faced lie (i.e. it is not true, and he knows it’s not true, much to his own dismay) to the Turkish people and to the world:

Isn’t it funny how he also says that Turkey is not a Muslim nation but is also a “nation of ideas”? Yep, and those ideas, BO, are basically Muslim, given that something like 99% of that population and all of its laws are based on Muslim law. You can’t dismiss centuries of history, culture, and society by simply saying that it doesn’t exist. Geez, if that’s all you had to do to eliminate pesky facts, we could all just say that this is not a nation in debt, that this is not a time of economic crisis, that we are not being stalked by fanatic fundamentalist Muslims who hate us and want us all dead, that there is no global problem with poverty, disease, and genocide. Hey! That’s it, let’s just say it isn’t so.

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4 thoughts on “Obama on the US: "We Are Not a Christian Nation"

  1. <>I’ve read that he’s really talking about America as a “melting pot” of religions, that we accept all religions here, and that we embrace freedom of religion. All true, of course, but not at all what he said. Or meant.<>i admit that i’d like it if that’s what he meant, but it’s just wishful thinking.

  2. I would LOVE it if that were what he meant, Kerry, but you’re right, it’s wishful thinking. He could just as easily have said that we are a melting pot who welcome people of all faiths, but he didn’t. He had his twelve teleprompters up and running, and he said exactly what he meant. It scares the s–t out of me. HE scares the s–t out of me.

  3. “How can a man stand in front of the world, swearing on a Bible to protect and defend this nation, and then a few months later spout out this nonsense that this country, that one he swore on the Bible to protect and defend, is not a Christian nation?”

    Because it isn't such. The Treaty of Tripoli even expressed this explicitly LONG ago.

    “Art. 11. As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion; as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion, or tranquility, of Mussulmen; and, as the said States never entered into any war, or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation, it is declared by the parties, that no pretext arising from religious opinions, shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Tripoli

    On top of this, you don't find a reference to Christianity in the U. S. Constitution. Maybe you'll want to bring up the non-legal Declaration of Independence, but mere references to “God” or “Creator” or “Divine Providence” does not necessarily mean Christianity either. So,

    “And why isn't the world laughing at him?”

    Because he's right.

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